The language most want to speak fluent in the UK is Spanish

After a well dedicated survey done by TravelSupermarket the language most want to speak fluently is Spanish (24 per cent). It was followed by the French and the Italian language I have read this morning in a short article in the Daily Express.

This article wrote by Nathan Rao (Consumer Affairs editor) it was actually quite interesting and revealed some of the most frequently used mimes when we are abroad. Example: pretending to write in your hand to indicate you want the bill.

That article also talks a bit of how Britons abroad talk to foreigners. Because I am a foreigner I know perfectly what is all about.

The study mention that 14 per cent of the speak English slowly and very loud. So I would like to make a point here. If you speak with a foreign person firstly you should try to see how they react to your normal English. Perhaps they have been living in the UK long time like me! Ok perhaps not. So you will realize this straight away. You should try to use easy sentences in order to make easy the communication and be open minded remember they make say things in the other way round. (Spanish, French Italians, Portuguese)

Another important observation, don´t be loud otherwise you really are in the pub! If they can´t understand you try to change the sentence, don´t use the same sentence. Even if you shout chances are that they can´t get it. “No entienden nada de nada” If you know a bit of Spanish and I say that sentences to you perhaps you don´t know what does it means.

If that´s the case it doesn´t really make any difference by saying “NO ENTIENDEN NADA DE NADA”. However instead if I say to you. “No comprenden” You will of course understand. Use synonyms “similar words” change the phrases and I know this could be difficult for a lot of people try to avoid “phrasal verbs” What are they? Verb + adverb or verb + preposition

This of course can be really difficult for English natives because that´s your normal way to talk. In my opinion this is probably one of the most difficult of English Grammar for Spanish speakers.

It was actually quite funny to know that 6 per cent of the people admit “doing a Steve McClaren” imitating the former England manager by talking English with a strange Spanish or foreign accent.

If you want to read this article check the page 13 of the Daily Express Saturday June 15 2013.

If you want some Spanish Lessons you are in the correct site.

Manchester United stars – Spanish

You can read an interesting article wrote by Chris Morris published in the Sale and Altrincham advertiser Newspaper on the 13th of March.

If you are a Manchester supporter you probably know that the Goalkeeper David de Gea and the striker Javier Hernandez are Spanish speakers. David is from Madrid and Javier is from Mexico.

They went to Broadoak secondary school to chat students in Spanish. Apparently the children in the school manage to interview the Spanish footballers pretty well. That event it was actually recorded and it will be aired sometime in April so other students will be able to take advantage and use this resource in their Spanish lessons. Please do not send us e-mails regarding this. We don´t know when it will be available. The lesson was filmed by the Reds´ on TV station.

“understanding of how important it is to study a language at school, as you never know how useful it might be in the future” quoted by Sale and Altrincham advertiser Newspaper.

We hope you find this post interesting and you can read a bit more about this Spanish event at the the Broadoak school

If you want some  Spanish Lessons you are in the correct site.

Educational problems in South Africa

No hope for teachers in a Primary School. Great headline to read in a newspaper of a developing country.

Another more amazing fact from this article, which says that repeated studies show that the majority of primary school teachers are not even able to do fractions. There are not fractions found in calculus, normal everyday fractions.

I think South Africa is a country that is going forward even when most of the world most well-off countries seem as though they are starting to bite the dust. To be honest I am pretty sure the faith and hope is starting to fade with each report that is produced in the education sector and the results indicated that there was a positive outlook to be had on South Africa’s future.

What is also sad and disheartening is the education disparity that is arising due to these kind of facts. How can young children who were born into relatively disadvantaged homes ever truly achieve their full potential and become diligent and respected middle to higher class members of society if the teaching isn’t up to standards. How can they get a suitable school?

It is upsetting for any nation, no matter where it may lie on the economical ladder, to have public primary school teachers who have got a minimal, at best, knowledge of mathematics and, to make matters worse, go on strike because they believe that they do not get paid an amount that fits the quality and effort they put in to their teaching.

Little hope for teachers. It is sad that there is no hope for those who should have already maximized their own potential.

Did you find in our school supplies what you was looking for? (Spanish info)

Nepal School using a bilingual whiteboard

A bilingual whiteboard has been used in the Ullens School in Kathmandu.

This is my opinion about a very interesting article I have read that it was recently wrote by Helen Swire. She is talking about how to adapt interactive materials to teach Nepali and English simultaneously.

She is first giving a background about the Ullens School in Kathmandu.

Apparently is the first school in Nepal to teach the International Baccalaureate. However they also teach their mother tongue Nepali. Nepali language is really difficult to learn and can often be sidelined. On the other hand the school thought it could be use an interactive whiteboard in order to teach both English and Nepal. However a problem with the power cuts and electricity shortages was identified. Ullens School has been the first school to introduce those boards and they had invested in a backup power system to overcome to the reality of the main problem.

The interactive whiteboards Ullens School has used are the Promethean Activboards, which are really language friendly user however they lack content made for the device for teaching Nepali said Helen.

Ullens School has been nominated for the UNesco Wenhui award for the Educational Innovation.

Just to remember that this technology could also be used with some other languages so far I believe Chinese is one of them.

I personally think this technology could be really beneficial and useful to use in the UK. At least here there are no major power failures, most of the school got the technology in their hands but I haven´t actually seeing the use of it at this degree. Haven’t you? This could be extremely beneficial tool to teach children a second language, Spanish, French German …

Please, please, please… I am not talking here about the different software or suppliers that the schools use to provide MFL during curricular lessons as we also do. It is a great powerful tool where all the UK children could benefit from it.

In Helen’s article you will also find some tips and things to consider if you decide to implement this technology.

We hope you like this article about the Nepal School in Kathmandu (Descriptive writing).

Michael Gove proposes teaching foreign languages from age five

It is a great article and discussion forum this morning in the The guardian

The education secretary says during the conference interview: “Thttp://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2011/sep/30/michael-gove-teaching-languages-conference?commentpage=all#start-of-commentshere is a slam-dunk case for extending foreign languages, and we just need to speak louder in English. It is literally the case that learning languages makes you smarter. The neural networks in the brain strengthen as a result of language learning.”

We are not going to comment anymore just read yourself here:

The guardian